Backgrounds and Art Journaling

Hi everyone,

Today I’m going to catch-up on a technique which I promised some friends on my online groups that I would share here.  They have been waiting a couple of weeks so I thought it was time to get down and dirty, well I won’t but Kim Dellow does.  Now, Kim’s technique is a little different from the method I actually used in making some of my backgrounds – which raised the query about my technique.  My technique, came from a combination of Kim’s videos and a course I was doing called “Coloring made meaningful” on “Determined to Shine“.  I sort of “blended” the two techniques to fit my purposes at the time.

What you will need:

  • a plastic craft sheet or workspace you don’t mind getting dirty/messy,
  • acrylic paint – choose two to three colours which blend/go well together,
  • an old credit card (cc) or similar item to spread the paint, you can use a palet knife if you prefer;
  • stencils, stamps to make different shapes, effects
  • of course watercolour papers (A4 or A5 or A6 I’m using Australian paper sizes or what they call International) – normal “copy” paper is too thin and will be unusable after one coat.
  • I used a “brick” stencil, a “honeycomb” stencil and one other stencil with flowers, and a couple of Michael Strong Stamps.

Method: (this is the messy bit):

Place a piece of your watercolour paper on your plastic mat, put a reasonable dollop of each colour, not too close to each other on your paper, then using the cc begin spreading the colours so they mix as you spread.  Once you have a reasonable coverage and the mix you like, place your stencil on top and go over it with your cc/palet knife, to push the stencil in, to give some dimension.  Slowly pull stencil off and wash stencil before paint dries on it.  Stamp – if you wish, for the effect you want, again washing stamp as soon as you’re done.

Also, you can place a piece of paper over the top while you still have the stencil in place and again using your cc or palet knife to “impress” the top piece of paper, essentially using Kim’s technique of closing two “pages” together and pull apart to give a background effect on both pages (videos).

Once you have the backgrounds done, let them dry and you can use as a base for scrapbooking or even making cards.  I used one for a card and the other as a scrapbook page. (see below)

I got about three or four backgrounds, some may  look a bit thick and colourless but the final effects look good, to me anyway.  Admittedly when I first saw the videos and began my “Coloring made useful” course I thought the process would be too difficult and messy, but it was more fun than anything, even for someone like me who doesn’t like getting her hands dirty – I had paint even on my elbows! lol.

So here are two videos by Kim Dellow:

Here is the card and scrapbook page that I specifically set out to do:

“Smile” card made for a swap
Scrapbook page made for “Coloring made useful”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And here are two examples I haven’t used for anything yet, the one on the left is clearly using the honeycomb and flower stencil, the one on the right is using the brick stencil, but the paint is a little thick to get a clear look but still usable as a background, these are untrimmed:


 

I hope you enjoy the technique and give it a go, you are welcome to try it and attach your example to your comments.

Thank you for looking.  Until next time…. cheers.

 

 

 

 

 

Author: raevon59

Scrapbooker, card maker and Creative Memories Advisor. My goal since 2020 and beyond is to make scrapbooks for other people. I would really like to spend more time filling albums with my scrapbook pages, writing books, making cards and helping others with their scrapbooking and card making. Want to know more? Send me a message.

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